Citizen Media Watch

juni 24th, 2007

Vacation time

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

I’m off on vacation for a couple of weeks, and probably won’t be updating much during that time. First off I’ll go to Fridhem Folkögskola for a one week course in short story writing, then I’ll go to Budapest on vacation.
Have a great summer! I’ll be back fully online sometime after July 9.



juni 17th, 2007

Danish media's move to web-first publishing

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

A year ago, Danish newspaper Politiken moved their newsdesk online. Now Berlingske Tidende is taking it one step further. ALL journalists are to work for the web edition as well as for print. Stories will be published online first.

Behind the move is Berlingske’s new editor-in-chief, Lisbeth Knudsen. According to New Media Trends, she says the new strategy has ”earthquake” like dimensions.

As Jon Lund at New Media Trends points out, there are a number of challenges to face for Berlingske.
Having traditional journalists refocus on web publishing takes time and energy. One important aspect is that the print journalists will find out what it’s like to get instant feedback within seconds of writing an article, and they’ll learn to start to think of publishing as communication. The result will hopefully result in better products, both online and in print.


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juni 14th, 2007

The need for usability in podcasting

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Karin Høgh talked about usability in podcasting

Karin Høgh‘s focus in her presentation on Podcamp was usability, and by giving a multitude of examples she showed that this is not something that podcasters have given much thought. Starting out, she gave her definition of a podcast, which you can see above. She also pointed out that this excludes streaming radio or sites that simply publish a download link to an audio file.
Thomas Plessis objected, saying there’s not necessarily a need for an RSS feed.
– Most people want to listen on the website, he said.
– The definition is something we have to talk about, Karin Høgh replied. For me the feed is important, that you can subscribe and bring it with you automatically.
Among the difficulties possible podcast subscribers encounter are:

  • Confusing buttons and instructions for subscriptions
  • Language barriers – for instance, which gender is the word podcast in languages where this is relevant?
  • definitions – is video also a podcast, and if not, what do you call it?
  • People wonder: Do you need an iPod to listen?
  • People wonder: What’s an RSS feed?
  • People wonder: Aggregator – strange word
  • People wonder: Syndication -”something with unions?”
  • People wonder: Subscribe? – I don’t want to give them my credit card!
  • People wonder: Synchronization – what is that?

…and get no answers.
Richard Gatarski commented:
– Most publishers don’t care about usability because it costs money and it’s an experiment. They think people who want to listen will figure it out.
Karin Høgh mentioned a number of important factors in usability for podcasters: Keep it simple, don’t use the word ”subscribe”, keep it accessible for all – non savvies, stupid people, the blind, colour blind, old people etc.
– Do we need standards?, she asked.
– I think we do, so as less advanced people can start doing this.
Her solution is a service called PodHandle, which is supposed to do all of this for you in easy steps. It looked simple enough, but I am also quite sure there are a number of similar services already available.

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.


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juni 13th, 2007

X3M Radio Pleppo won the Swedish Podcast Awards

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Rasmus Sellberg and Andy Nyman presenting the Swedish Podcast AwardsThe Swedish Podcast Awards were won by Finns. The overall award went to X3M Radio Pleppo. Congratulations!

The price ceremony, which was held at Podcamp Europe, was quite small, with just one of the winners present. Nevertheless it’s a really good initiative, putting focus on podcasting and the development we’re seeing in this field.

This year, two new categories were added. Best original podcast and Best amateur podcast. This is a way to balance the domination from mainstream media. Both categories were won by Disco Belle.

The other winners are:
Best music: Disco Belle
Best technology/science: The Nerd Herd
Best humor: X3M Radio Pleppo
Best culture/entertainment: DN på Stan (de enda(!) som var där för att hämta priset)
Best news, economy, society: P3 Dokumentär
Best pod tv: SVT Rapport
Best foreign podcast: Keith and the Girl

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.


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juni 12th, 2007

Singapore – a small place with big online influence

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Sriram Krishnan and Justin Lee

Sriram Krishnan talked about media landscapes in Singapore. It was meant to be a joint presentation with his friend Justin Lee in Singapore, but that didn’t quite work out. Probably because the internet connetion here really sucks.
Anyway, Singapore is interesting because of it’s small size yet prominent position online. Sriram showed that out of the top ten search terms on Technorati, two were individuals from Singapore.
The reason? Part of the explanation is that Singaporeans are early adopters, they have good infrastucture, pick up trends from Japan and Europe.
The younger generation want to express themselves more. There are more blogs than youths in Singapore, Sriram Krishnan said.
The government, ”Gahmen”, is revamping schools with tablet pcs, podcasts and other high-tech stuff. But they also set limits to what you can say and do both irl and online.
– The sedition act says you can’t speak your mind. If you do and it’s considered to be dissatisfactory to the governement, you’ll be put in jail.
Krishnan showed a site called Stomp, which is the gahmen’s answer to web2.0 for young people.
– In my opinion it’s failed miserably. It’s a bad site.
There’s also content regulation online. The govenment wants to preserve traditional Asian values. Political bloggers needed to register prior to the elections in 2006, and podcasts were banned altogether.

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.


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juni 12th, 2007

”You are all friends here, you just don't know it”

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Chris Brogan at Podcamp

Chris Brogan talks about the power of communities and social networks.
I love it that his slides are just photos of people he’s got to know through blogging/podcasting. He invites everyone to connect.
– You are all friends here, you just don’t know it, Chris Brogan says. You can connect to some really interesting people in this environment.
– There’s a trick in this podcasting thing – everybody’s a superhero. You now have access to tools that can let you do something that’s bigger than what you do in your every day.

Tools you could use:
Presence software – twitter, jaiku
Blogs – no longer a question of whether to blog as a company, but what to blog about
Video, audio – Brogan’s surprised not more people in the audience are doing video or audio.
Cameras and phones now have decent video recording options.
Connecting to people through social networks.
Live video and audio.
Services: BlogTV, uStream, BlogTalk.

– Having a plain old static web site right now is a horrible idea.

He warns about YouTube more or less owning your material if you upload it to them, and at the same time says it’s the best way to reach a large audience.

Alfred Ruth asks a question about credibility, as Brogan mentioned getting Nokia phones etc.
– Credibility in journalism is important, but you are right that bloggers are more marketers than journalists if they talk about stuff they’ve recieved.
He says disclosure is the key.
– It could be you don’t like it too.
Christopher Penn jumps in, saying ”they can ask you to blog about a product, but not to blog positively about it”.

These notes are a bit random, because Chris talks really fast.. : )

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.



juni 12th, 2007

”Convergence is good because it means freedom”

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Thomas Plessis at Podcamp Europe

Thomas Plessis, CEO of Play 6, and associate dir. of radiopodcast.com, is talking about media convergence and the importance of great content. He’s naming all the aspects of podcasting, like production, tools, jingles, subject…

You have to make different products for different media though, Plessis says.
– You can’t put the same thing on podcast as on mobile phone. The phone has a limit of 2-3 minutes.
But at radiopodcast.com most podcasts are that short on the web too. There are some 20 shows.
Sometimes they do podcasts in both audio and video at the same time.

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.

Btw, Anton and Gitta are also live blogging from Podcamp.


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juni 12th, 2007

Podcamp Europe under way – Christopher Penn's advice on podcast marketing

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Break at Podcamp Europe

After some pretty bad network problems everything seems to be up and running at Podcamp Europe. I spent the greater part of Christopher Penn‘s talk on marketing aspects of podcasting working out these network problems, but here’s what I snapped up.

Christopher S PennHe talked a lot about evangelists, the people who really like your podcast and so they market it for free. And so you have to give something back to them, to make them want to keep doing it. He mentioned live videos from your podcasts, free cds that bands might send you, have competions where the first people who mail in might get some freebies etc.
Also it’s a good idea to make places for them to hang out.

He had a bunch of useful advice on important features on the podcast’s website.

  • You need text to accompany your media.
  • It might be a good idea to have mailing lists or send lists with show notes, news etc.
  • Have your first episde available for people who are new to your podcast.
  • Give your visitors things to do on your site, obvious calls to action.
  • Subscription has to be one click, or you’ll lose listeners.
  • Offer both download and direct play options.

More advice form Christopher Penn:
It’s important how you name your show – the name needs to be easy to share by word of mouth.
Add your subscription buttons to your social media profiles on for instance Facebook or MySpace.
Use the analytics – see who’s visiting your site, who is linking to you, and go to their site and connect.

A couple of services mentioned:
Reactee.com – you print t-shirts, they set up an sms gateway, and people can text message it and get your url in return
crazyegg.com – shows where on my web page ppl are clicking
feedburner.com – offers good statistics

To check out all my photos from Podcamp, check out to my Podcamp Flickr set.


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juni 3rd, 2007

Slots available to give a presentation at PodCamp Europe

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

PodCamp Europe is coming up in ten days (June 12-13, in Stockholm, Sweden), and by the looks of it it will be a cool event. But there are still slots to fill in the presentation schedule. If you have something to say about podcasting, blogging or social media in general, don’t miss out on this opportunity.

What is PodCamp Europe? It’s an UnConference of podcasters, bloggers, and new media professionals & amateurs for two days to share, explore, challenge, and grow our abilities in new media. Learn about audio and video podcasting, blogging, photography, Second Life, Twitter, and all kinds of other new and social media tools. Whether you’re a veteran or interested in getting started, PodCamp is for YOU.

My personal requests/wishes for speakers/topics:

  • it would be nice to get a presentation from the guys from Twingly (who are coming to PodCamp anyway)
  • something on vlogging and how it’s developed
  • community management and trolls
  • creativity at the core – why all this tech stuff is just different tools of expression. I’d like to hear this from someone who expresses herself/himself creatively, an inspiring pep-talk with an artist’s perspective on the web, with examples of creative projects to join or steal ideas from ; )
  • gadgets – what are the best options for blogging and podcasting today
  • someone from trig.com – how’s it going?

What would you like to hear?

If you don’t want to make a presentation, make sure to sign up as a participant for PodCamp Europe anyway. If Hey2007 was cool in the way interaction and blogging in different ways was encouraged, I am hoping an unconference will be even more so. And as far as I know this will be the first unconference to be held in Sweden.


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juni 2nd, 2007

Law enforcement in virtual worlds

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Interesting Washington Post piece on law enforcement in virtual worlds like Second Life or the game World of Warcraft.

Two years ago, Japanese authorities arrested a man for carrying out a series of virtual muggings in another popular game, Lineage II, by using software to beat up and rob characters in the game and then sell the virtual loot for real money.

The key question is whether for instance rape, child abuse, mugging and killing online should be compared to these acts in the real world. And if so, which country’s laws should the crimes fall under.

Philip Rosedale, the founder and chief executive of Linden Labs, said in an interview that Second Life activities should be governed by real-life laws for the time being. He recounted, for example, that his company has called in the FBI several times, most recently this spring to ensure that Second Life’s virtual casinos complied with U.S. law. Federal investigators created their own avatars and toured the site, he said.

In coming months, his company plans to disperse tens of thousands of computer servers from California and Texas to countries around the world in order to improve the site’s performance. Also, he said, this will make activities on those servers subject to laws of the host countries.


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