Citizen Media Watch

januari 28th, 2009

Major migration of the Swedish microblogosphere to Bloggy

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Bloggy is the new microblogging site of choice for Swedes. In a short time the site has gained about 3 000 users and continues to grow.
– I was thinking: Can I do this better?, says Jonas Lejon, the man behind the service, to Citizen Media Watch.

Jonas Lejon, BloggyIn Sweden Jaiku has to a large extent been the microblog of choice. But with frequent downtimes, no new features for a long time and Google’s recent announcement that they’re turning it into an open source project, people were ready for an alternative.
In steps Jonas Lejon, an entrepreneur who’s behind several blog-related services in Sweden, who puts together Bloggy, a microblogging service in Swedish. He gets enthusiastic cheers, good feedback, and he responds. More than that, he responds quickly, adds new features, tweaks them, and does in a few months what Jaiku with all its Google backup hasn’t done in years.

When he announced a function for importing all your Jaiku contacts into Bloggy, there was no holding back the migration anymore. Over the weekend my mailbox has been flooded with friends requests from Bloggy users who have imported their contacts.
While it’s a bit sad to let Jaiku go, Bloggy is clearly where the action’s at for the Swedish microblogosphere at the moment. One of the great features is that you can easily follow and update both Jaiku and Twitter from within Bloggy, so you’re not really missing much, even if Bloggy still lacks support for channels. It has adopted many of Jaiku’s features, but it is a bit more like a community than a pure microblogging service.
I asked Jonas Lejon what made him develop the service.
– I was using Pownce, Twitter and Jaiku and I was tired of em all. I was thinking: Can I do this better? So i started developing Bloggy 8 months ago and implemented all the functions I liked from the other microblogging platforms, he says.
How come you decided to do Bloggy in Swedish?
– I think that the English language still feels uncomfortable for many Swedes and that providing a service in Swedish makes it more friendly. ”By Swedes for Swedes”.

So far, we haven’t seen how it performs under heavy load. Monday provided one challenge with Thomas Mattsson at Expressen writing about it and giving it lots of space on their front page.

Thomas Mattsson on Bloggy and Twitter in Expressen.se

Also Bloggy was mentioned in Dagens Nyheter the other day.
There were a couple of downtimes Monday, but Jonas Lejon assures those problems are now taken care of.
– I’m working very close to our datacenters and they are helping me out with upgrading the server all the time when I reach the limits and I’m fixing performance bugs all the time and now it seems that all problems are gone.
You deserve praise for the way you handle feedback quickly and keep on improving the features. You seem to be online on Bloggy 24/7. Do you ever sleep? : )
– Thanks! I’ve been working a lot the last few days but I’m trying to take some offline time now and then and relax.


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januari 23rd, 2009

listentoblogs.com at 24 hour business camp

Posted by Gitta Wilen

About 90 internet entrepreneurs gathered at 24 hour business camp. The task was to create a web/mobile based service, during 24 hours. Starting Thursday at noon, ending Friday at noon.

Team Eric Wahlforss (co-founder Sound Cloud), Henric Berggren (Sound Cloud), and David Kjelkerud, student at KTH, worked on an application they call listentoblogs.com.

Henrik Berggren was truly enthusiastic yesterday when he told CMW about the way it works:

– It is a really simple site where bloggers come and blogreaders come, not to read their favourite blogs, but to listen to them.

The idea is that you should be able to read, record and upload your or any blog at listentoblogs.com, and subscribe to it as a podcast straight to your mp3 player.

– We are supporting all big open formats. This is possible because we have built it on top of an awesome platform called Sound Cloud and App Engine. It is a glue between this kind of cloud-based services.

teamlistentoblogs
The listentoblogs.com team: Berggren, Kjelkerud, Wahlforss.

24hbc took place at Hasseludden Yasuragi, about 20 min drive from Stockholm.

tedvalentin

The guy behind 24hbc is Ted Valentin, a Swedish entrepreneur, who has created stuff like: sushikartan (The Sushi Map), Wifikartan (The Wifi Map), Minkarta (My Map) and… Sites that maps different kinds of services and/or places.

– 24hbc is the place to try things out. The focus is to get things done. Not to be afraid to fail, Ted says.

The atmosphere at 24hbc is a mix of hard work, playing around and hanging out.

Erik Starck, one of the participants, said:

– It is like the punk movment all over.

The Swedish TV channel TV4 reported from the event early this morning. On Nyhetsmorgon (only in Swedish).


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januari 20th, 2009

Twingly offers microblog search

Posted by Lotta Holmstrom

Twingly expands its search engine with a brand new microblog search tool. They’ve been working on it for six months and today it was released.
In the Twingly blog, they write:

When we last summer started to see the microblogging-hype we felt that a search dedicated to microblogs would be a quite natural development for us. We like Twitter Search and been using it a lot, especially at conferences and when news like Mumbai were having the best news source at Twitter. But because we used Jaiku ourselves it wasn’t what we needed in many cases.

Microblogging services covered by Twingly’s search engine are: Twitter, Jaiku, Identi.ca, Pownce (which is dead, but a six month archive remains searchable), Swedish Bloggy.se and the German Bleeper.de.
They will keep adding new services, and aim to cover all microblogging services out there.


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januari 18th, 2009

Citizen media rules! $5 million to local journalism projects in the US

Posted by Gitta Wilen

There is a truly interesting trend going on in the US, supported by the Knight Foundation. Local media gets the money and support. An important movement in days of economical depression.

Read Write Web writes:

”While the Knight Foundation’s endowment has been hurt by the current economic climate, the Foundation is still committed to granting a total of $24 million to local media projects over the next five years.

As the newspaper industry still continues on its downward spiral, with more and more local papers facing bankruptcy, these citizen media projects will be able to fill the need for better local news in quite a few communities around the country. In Connecticut, for example, a new local news site will be staffed with a mix of professional and citizen journalists, after the town had lost both its newspaper and local radio station in the last decade.”

CMW has been writing about Swedish hyperlocal blogging. Maybe this is the way to go? A good mix of citizen contributors and professional journalists. The local content is best found local and it is worth the money.

The Knight Foundation believes it is about democracy:

At Knight Foundation, we firmly believe that you cannot effectively manage the affairs of a community in a democracy without the free flow of information.

That’s why we believe that information is a core community need, as critical as any to a healthy community,” said Alberto Ibargüen, Knight Foundation’s president and CEO.

Citizen Media Watch wants to thank Joakim Jardenberg at Mindpark for having a conversation with us about this subject. How will local newspaper be able to make enough money online to be able to survive? And it is like Joakim says: ”Riktigt djävla hårda fakta” – Really … hard facts.


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januari 2009
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